iOS 12 Public Beta 8: The Surprise Two-fer Edition

iOS 12 Public Beta 8: The Surprise Two-fer Edition

Mobile-Technology
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It’s not even my birthday!Anthony Karcz

We’re back! I didn’t expect to see everyone again so soon, but Apple ramped up the beta cycle a little bit early, simultaneously releasing iOS 12 Public Beta 8 and Developer Beta 10.

What’s changed between Tuesday and today? Checking the release notes, not a whole bunch. In fact, if you went off those, you’d say absolutely nothing has changed. The Developer Beta release notes are a cut and paste of the ones that accompanied the release earlier this week. My only guess is that this was a quick fix of some background item that needed to be taken care of before it became a bigger issue.

What’s Fixed

"Nothing." Meaning "nothing that Apple was willing to share with beta testers." There was definitely a change of some sort, but Cupertino is keeping this one under their flying saucer-shaped hat.

What’s Still Broken

  • Maybe you should ask the people you’re trying to add to HomeKit that have multiple e-mail addresses registered why they need so many. If they only had one, you’d be able to add them without a problem.
  • If you don’t change the Screen Time password after upgrading, your kids will be able to sign out of iCloud or change the system time.
  • Picked Up Phone data is still inflated.
  • Using Siri Shortcuts while your device is locked may not work as expected (or at all).
  • Apple Pay is still randomly unavailable. I’ve encountered this and it’s more annoying than anything else. Trying the purchase again usually fixes it. Restarting your device definitely fixes it.
  • iOS 12 is still having issues with T-Mobile. It’s not a persistent issue for all T-Mobile users, however.

What’s New

  • Did you enjoy the Downtime feature prior to installing iOS 12? If so, you might have noticed your set times were all wonky. It’s not you, it’s the beta. Just configure it again to fix it.
  • Traffic? We don’t need no stinking traffic. And neither does Maps, apparently, in the Public Beta 7 release.

What’s Next for iOS 12

A switch to two-a-week beta releases (if Apple truly is switching it over at this point and this wasn’t a one-off deal) signals that we’re nearly at the end of the iOS 12 Beta. Hopefully this means we’ll see some of the major bugs (like Apple Pay intermittently working and T-Mobile calls possibly dropping when switching from Wifi) get fixed very soon.

That also means we’ll be getting the gold master release early in September, likely before whatever iPhone event Apple is planning (where they’ll finally unveil all those iPhone X variations, the evidence of which were discovered in the guts of this beta).

Standard caveats apply, but chances are if your device was fine with iOS 12 Public Beta 7, then Public Beta 8 isn’t going to be a problem. Check the list for bugs that are going to ruin your day and downgrade back to iOS 11.4 or skip this beta release if something pops out at you. If you just don’t care and are in it for the long haul, flip that Automatic Update toggle. The releases after this point should be close-to-public-release stable.

If you prefer the manual method (always smart when dealing with beta software), head to Settings > General > Software Update and get started. Good luck!

“>

It’s not even my birthday!Anthony Karcz

We’re back! I didn’t expect to see everyone again so soon, but Apple ramped up the beta cycle a little bit early, simultaneously releasing iOS 12 Public Beta 8 and Developer Beta 10.

What’s changed between Tuesday and today? Checking the release notes, not a whole bunch. In fact, if you went off those, you’d say absolutely nothing has changed. The Developer Beta release notes are a cut and paste of the ones that accompanied the release earlier this week. My only guess is that this was a quick fix of some background item that needed to be taken care of before it became a bigger issue.

What’s Fixed

“Nothing.” Meaning “nothing that Apple was willing to share with beta testers.” There was definitely a change of some sort, but Cupertino is keeping this one under their flying saucer-shaped hat.

What’s Still Broken

  • Maybe you should ask the people you’re trying to add to HomeKit that have multiple e-mail addresses registered why they need so many. If they only had one, you’d be able to add them without a problem.
  • If you don’t change the Screen Time password after upgrading, your kids will be able to sign out of iCloud or change the system time.
  • Picked Up Phone data is still inflated.
  • Using Siri Shortcuts while your device is locked may not work as expected (or at all).
  • Apple Pay is still randomly unavailable. I’ve encountered this and it’s more annoying than anything else. Trying the purchase again usually fixes it. Restarting your device definitely fixes it.
  • iOS 12 is still having issues with T-Mobile. It’s not a persistent issue for all T-Mobile users, however.

What’s New

  • Did you enjoy the Downtime feature prior to installing iOS 12? If so, you might have noticed your set times were all wonky. It’s not you, it’s the beta. Just configure it again to fix it.
  • Traffic? We don’t need no stinking traffic. And neither does Maps, apparently, in the Public Beta 7 release.

What’s Next for iOS 12

A switch to two-a-week beta releases (if Apple truly is switching it over at this point and this wasn’t a one-off deal) signals that we’re nearly at the end of the iOS 12 Beta. Hopefully this means we’ll see some of the major bugs (like Apple Pay intermittently working and T-Mobile calls possibly dropping when switching from Wifi) get fixed very soon.

That also means we’ll be getting the gold master release early in September, likely before whatever iPhone event Apple is planning (where they’ll finally unveil all those iPhone X variations, the evidence of which were discovered in the guts of this beta).

Standard caveats apply, but chances are if your device was fine with iOS 12 Public Beta 7, then Public Beta 8 isn’t going to be a problem. Check the list for bugs that are going to ruin your day and downgrade back to iOS 11.4 or skip this beta release if something pops out at you. If you just don’t care and are in it for the long haul, flip that Automatic Update toggle. The releases after this point should be close-to-public-release stable.

If you prefer the manual method (always smart when dealing with beta software), head to Settings > General > Software Update and get started. Good luck!

(Excerpt) Read more Here | 2018-08-24 18:14:16